Mid-Life Cycling

Mid-Life Cycling

22 July 2014

If You Crossed Daniel Rebour With James Thurber...

Now I am going to pose a completely pointless question, as I am wont to do.

Here goes:  What would Daniel Rebour have drawn for the New Yorker?

I think I've found the answer:








The man responsible for this drawing, Jean-Jacques Sempe, in fact did a cover for the publication E.B. White made famous:

 1983 The New Yorker cover 

He was born in Bordeaux in 1932 and is, from what I understand, still active.  He is very well-known in France as well as other countries, mainly for the often-whimsical and often romantic, if sentimental (sounds really French, doesn't it?) work for Paris Match. Here in the US, more people have seen his work than know of the man who did it.















Can you imagine Sempe in a room with James Thurber--or Daniel Rebour?


21 July 2014

The Lunartic

For a moment, I thought someone tried to ride a handcuff.





Turns out, the contraption is even cleverer (Now there's a word only a Brit can get away with using!) than that. 


That strange-looking rear wheel is belt-driven and hubless.  (Could even a Brit get away with saying "hubless"?)  The moving parts are housed, which makes the bike's wheelbase. 


Luke Douglas, the wheel's creator, said he was trying to make a bike as compact as possible without having to fold it.  He said he was also trying to eliminate the awkward ride qualities of many folding or collapsible bikes.


At the time he designed it, he was a student at the Loughborough (UK) Design School.  He entered it in the 2011 competition for the James Dyson Award.  Alas, he didn't win.


He should have gotten some kind of award, though, for the name he gave his invention:  the Lunartic.


20 July 2014

Sunday Sailing


I admit this photo hasn't much to do with cycling, save for the fact that I took it on Point Lookout, one of the places to which I pedaled last week.

But somehow it seems right for a Sunday afternoon in summer.  And I suppose it has something like composition and a balance of tones in it.  Even if it doesn't, I hope you like it.